Seattle proposes rules for Paid Sick and Safe Leave ordinance – first community comment mtg Thursday

The Seattle Office for Civil Rights (SOCR) has proposed Administrative Rules for the City Paid Sick and Safe Leave Ordinance – you can see them here: http://www.cityofseattle.net/civilrights/SickLeave.htm.

Public comment will be taken until Monday, April 30, 2012. Your input will be used to shape the final language of the Rules, which define terms used in the ordinance, and to clarify how SOCR will conduct enforcement.

Send comments via e-mail to rulecomment@seattle.gov, give input online at http://www.seattle.gov/civilrights/comment.htm, or submit them in writing to:

Seattle Office for Civil Rights
810 Third Ave., Suite 750
Seattle, WA  98104-1627
Attn:  Paid Sick/Safe Time Rule Comment

Two community meetings have been scheduled to take comments on the draft Rules. Both meetings are free and open to the public.

  • Thursday, April 12, 8:30-10:30 am.
    Bertha Knight Landes Room, Seattle City Hall, 600 4th Avenue
  • Tuesday, April 17, 3-5 pm.
    Treehouse, 2100 24th Ave. S. Room A

For more information about the meetings, to request language interpretation or an accommodation for a disability, contact Thai Nguyen at 206-684-4514 or thai.nguyen@seattle.gov.

If you have general questions about the Ordinance or about the materials available online, please contact Elliott.bronstein@seattle.gov or 206-684-4507.

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