More people think a UFO crashed in Roswell than support Social Security cuts

Flying_Saucer-_Aliens-_-_GPN-2000-001993A recent AARP poll of Americans found 84% of voters over 50 years old – across party lines – oppose cutting Social Security in order to reduce the deficit. Just 16% were in favor or didn’t know. To put that in perspective: another poll from this April found 21% of Americans think a UFO crashed in Roswell, NM in 1947 and the US government covered it up.

You read that right. More Americans think aliens crashed in Roswell than think we should cut Social Security to reduce the deficit.

When asked about specific proposals, 2 in 3 said they opposed switching to the Chained CPI for seniors benefits, and 3 in 4 opposed switching to the Chained CPI for veterans benefits.

ss-aarp-poll-chained-cpi

Seniors and retirees didn’t cause the deficit, and Social Security benefits shouldn’t be garnished to pay for Wall Street’s recession. But instead of asking the Wall Street guys making $1 million per hour to cover the cost of their malfeasance, President Obama and conservative members of Congress are instead looking to cut Social Security benefits via the Chained CPI.

Elected representatives take note: the poll asked respondents how they would react if their elected representatives voted in favor of the Chained CPI. 66% said they would be less favorable feelings toward their representative for voting that way. It seems not even a UFO crash will help incumbents if they vote for the Chained CPI.

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