Join EOI for a community forum with local leaders working on economic inequality

What’s being done here at home to support working families and broaden the middle class?

Join EOI on March 26th at 6:30 p.m. in Seattle to hear about local solutions to economic inequality from the leaders championing them.

We’ll be joined by Washington State Representative Jessyn Farrell to discuss her work towards raising Washington’s minimum wage to $12 an hour; Washington State Representative Laurie Jinkins will share updates from her fight to pass paid sick days; and Seattle City Council President Tim Burgess will talk about his proposal to bring universal preschool to Seattle.

RSVP required. Register here.

Who: Local leaders working to address economic inequality including Representative Jessyn Farrell, Representative Laurie Jinkins and Seattle City Councilmember Tim Burgess.

What: Taking on Inequality in Our Own Backyard

Where: The Board Room, 2100 Building, 2100 24th Ave S, Seattle, WA 98144

When: Wednesday, March 26th, 6:30 p.m.

Cost: Free, donations accepted

RSVP: Required. Register here.

There has been a lot in the news lately about economic inequality. Last year, former U.S. Secretary of Labor Robert Reich started a national conversation on income disparity through his groundbreaking documentary Inequality for All.

Even though economic inequality is a complex, institutional crisis, local action – from early education to living wages – can play a vital role in addressing it. Come find out how!

Join us for a lively forum on economic inequality and the fight for working families.

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